Injured or Fractured Ankle Settlements in Florida & on Cruises

Ankle Injury Settlements Broken Fractured Florida AccidentIn cases where someone is injured in Florida or on a cruise ship the value of pain and suffering component that I use a starting point for settlement purposes of a simple ankle fracture – or an ankle ligament tear with surgery caused by an accident or incident is approximately $25,000 to $50,000.

As I discuss further below, there is no guarantee that you will get a penny for your case though.

In cases where someone is injured in Florida or on a cruise ship, the starting point that I use for the pain and suffering portion of a trimalleolar fracture with surgery (where a plate(s) and screw(s) is inserted) is between $125,000 to $375,000 if there is a decent recovery and little, if any, resultant disability. 

 “Tri” means three. Trimalleolar fractures means that all three malleoli of the ankle are broken. These are unstable injuries and they can be associated with a dislocation.  I have seen trimalleolar ankle surgery verdicts for over $1 Million dollar (which I discuss further below), but most settlements are generally not for this amount.

The value range mentioned above refers to the settlement range for the pain and suffering portion of the claim. Below I will also talk about the starting point for settlement value when there is surgery to the ankle.

The above settlement value does not include other damages that you may get compensated (paid) for, such as lost wages and medical bills. When determining how much your case may be worth, your lost wages and medical bills are added to the value of pain and suffering.

There are many factors that affect how much money you may possibly receive. I also give examples of factors that affect how much money you may receive.

Some of the information about the settlement value of simple ankle fracture or surgery on an ankle tear does not apply if you have:

  • only a workers’ compensation case and not a case against someone other than your employer. But the pain and suffering component does apply if you are an employee of a cruise line and you were injured onboard the cruise ship.

Example of when you may not get money for pain and suffering for your ankle injury in Florida – Land based employee – No third party claim

Let’s assume that you are working as a bagger or other position in Publix Supermarkets in Miami or at another location in Florida.  Let’s assume that you are working on the sales floor or other area at a Publix Supermarket or any business in Miami, Florida. You slip and fall on a substance or liquid that was on the floor.

You fracture your ankle. We’ll assume that you don’t know who caused the water, liquid or other substance to get on the floor. The only claim that you most likely have is a workers compensation claim against your employer, in this case Publix.

Because you may not have a case against a third party (someone other than your employer), the settlement value that I talk about in this article does not apply to your workers compensation case. This is because in most scenarios, but not all, you are not entitled to get money for pain and suffering in Florida if your only claim for your injuries is against your employer.

In the above example, you do not have to prove that Publix was at fault in order to possibly get benefits from them.

Example of when you may get money for pain and suffering for your ankle injury in Florida – Land based employee – Third party claim

If we take the same facts as above except that the spill was caused by another company who was delivering or stacking items on the shelves, then the settlement value for pain and suffering that I reference in this article may apply.

Settlement Value of Pain and Suffering for Ankle Injury Applies If You’re Injured While Working for a Cruise Ship 

Unlike the above example, if you are injured while working for a cruise line (ship), then the settlement values mentioned in this article may apply.  This is because the Jones Act may apply and you may be able to get money for your pain and suffering if you can prove that the cruise line is at fault. Similar to an injury on the job in Florida, the cruise line should pay your medical bills and wages paid regardless of fault.

Example

Let us assume that you are working on a cruise ship which requires that your claim be brought in Miami.

Let’s assume that you are working in one of the following positions on a  Carnival cruise ship: waiter, cook, bar server, hotel steward, galley steward or another job. You slip and fall or are injured while lifting something that was heavy. You may be able to get money for pain and suffering if you can prove that Carnival did something wrong that caused your accident or incident. So let’s assume you have a tear in your ankle and you get surgery to repair it. The formula that I use is as follows:

Settlement = Value of Pain and Suffering for Ankle Tear with Surgery + Maintenance and Cure

Seamen who are injured while at sea are entitled to maintenance and cure from their employers. Maintenance is a seaman’s day-to-day living expenses. Cure is the seaman’s medical costs. Employers are required to pay maintenance and cure until the seaman is fit for duty, or until he or she has reached a point where additional medical treatment will not help him.

Settlement = ($25,000 to $50,000) + Maintenance and Cure

So you may, but are not guaranteed, to get somewhere between $25,000 and $50,000 in pain and suffering if you are injured while working on a cruise ship and you are an US resident. The cruise line should also send you to get medical treatment and pay for those bills, as well as pay you for your lost wages.  If you are not an US resident, you may get less if you are forced to go to arbitration in your home country. If you can’t prove that Carnival Cruise Line did something wrong (negligent) that caused your accident, then you may only be entitled to maintenance and cure.

Ankle Fracture – No Surgery – Pain and Suffering Settlements

The low end ($25,000) of the range is for an ankle fracture that heals within a few weeks with a little bit of physical therapy (PT), and if you have little to no permanent impairment (injury) or limitations.

The higher end of the range ($50,000) is for a longer period of treatment (about one year or longer), more serious future limitations on the use of your ankle, continuous serious pain, or a longer treatment period.

Trimalleolar Ankle – Surgery (with plate and screw a/k/a ORIF)

As I mentioned above, the starting point that I use for the pain and suffering portion of a trimalleolar fracture with surgery (where a plate and screw is inserted) is between $125,000 and $375,000 if there is a decent recovery and little, if any, resultant disability.  So many factors affect the value of a personal injury claim so there is no guarantee that you get any money for your injury.

A trimalleolar fracture with surgery is one of those injuries that have produced verdicts that are above $1 Million dollars. As in any personal injury case, if the injured person is likeable then he or she has a better chance of getting closer to the higher end of this range. The more that one’s activities of daily living are limited, then the greater the chance that he or she may get a settlement toward the higher end of the above range. Therefore, someone who has difficulty walking (with a limp or otherwise) will generally have a greater pain and suffering component to his or her claim than someone who can walk much better.

Actual Case (Not My Case): $1,600,000 Settlement for pain and suffering for a woman who had a trimalleolar fracture with a plate and 4 screws inserted (open reduction internal fixation). She had a separate surgery to remove the plate and screws.  Her ankle was in a cast for 6 weeks and she used a wheelchair during that time.

She allegedly slipped and fell in a depression (hole) on a restaurant’s property. She claimed the depression was caused by vehicles driving through the area. The case is Armstrong v. Wendy’s. The settlement was in 2007.

Now, let’s talk about some other actual settlements and verdicts for ankle injuries.

My Broken Ankle Settlements

$25,000 Settlement for a broken ankle for a slip and fall. My client was at least 50% at fault for not looking where she was walking. She also slipped seconds before the fall that resulted in her ankle fracture. This happened on a cruise ship.

My Settlements for an Ankle Ligament Tear

$64,900 Settlement for a man who had surgery to repair an unstable ankle ligament and peroneal tendon tear after he tripped and fell in a hole that was covered with grass overgrowth in a condominium complex. $58,000 of the total settlement amount was for pain and suffering.  The peroneal tendon can be seen in the image below.

Peroneal Tendon in the Ankle

The peroneal tendon can be seen in this image.  

Broken Ankle Settlements and Verdicts (Not my cases)

Actual Case (Not mine)$70,000 verdict for pain and suffering was affirmed (approved) for a 55-year-old woman who slipped and fell at an apartment complex in Miami-Dade County, Florida. She was also awarded approximately $5,200 for medical expenses. She fractured all three ankle bones, which is called a trimalleolar fracture.

She was hospitalized for ten days and was in a full leg cast for six weeks. As a result, she could not care for her disabled husband. The doctor gave her a 10% disability of the ankle, and she had continued pain, muscle atrophy, swelling, and a limp. Also, she was unable to walk long distances.

She was expected to live 24.3 years so she was awarded $3,000 per year for the rest of her life. This comes out to $7.00 to $8.00 a day. The appellate court stated that it could not say that the verdict exceeded the limits of the reasonable. The jury awarded her husband $10,000 on his derivative claim. Malpass v. Highlands Ins. Co., 387 So.2d 1042 (Fla. App. 3 Dist., 1980)

My opinion: In 1980, $70,000 was a reasonable amount for pain and suffering for a trimalleolar fracture in a case with similar facts. This was a very severe ankle fracture for her to spend 10 days in the hospital immediately following the injury.

$60,000 verdict (Not my case) for pain and suffering for a shopper who fractured her ankle when she claimed that she slipped on a worn out and wet carpet at Target in Miami-Dade County, Florida. She argued that Target should have fixed the carpet (a dangerous condition) before her fall. Target blamed her for not paying attention where she was walking. Her husband made a claim for loss of consortium, but the jury did not award him money. The verdict was in 2010 and the case is Hernandez v. Target.

My thoughts: Though I am not 100% certain, I think the entire verdict was for pain and suffering. If so, this verdict is within the range that I use as a starting point for settlement purposes for pain and suffering for an ankle fracture from an accident in Florida caused by someone else. Many juries give little, if anything, money for a loss of consortium claim if the spouse’s injury is not horrible. This is one of many personal injury verdicts for an accident at Target.

Actual Case (not mine)$2,000 for pain and suffering only for a 71 year-old woman who fractured her ankle when she fell down in a Publix parking lot in Palm Beach County, Florida. She was self-employed in a secretarial business. She claimed that she stepped in a hole (divet) at the corner of a storm drain in the parking lot and fell.

She claimed that Publix was negligent in failing to repair the drain. She was also awarded about $5,000 or The jury found her 50% at fault for the accident. The verdict was in 2003.

My thoughts: The amount awarded for pain and suffering is way below the average settlement value for a broken ankle in an accident in Florida caused by someone else. The amount that was awarded for pain and suffering will be cut in half (she’ll get $1,000) because she was 50% at fault for probably not paying attention. This is one of the many verdicts and settlements against Publix in Florida. The case is Lorraine v. Publix Supermarkets.

Settlements (not mine) for Ankle Tears

Surprisingly there are very few verdicts and settlements that I have seen for surgery from an ankle tear.

Actual Case (not mine): $45,000 Verdict for pain and suffering alone for acute and chronic synovitis (inflammation) to ankle which resulted in arthroscopy (surgery) one year later. The verdict was in 2002 and the accident happened in 1999. The Plaintiff was asked to by a security guard to move a 300 pound gate in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

While moving the gate, it landed on the Plaintiff’s foot and he fell to the ground. The Plaintiff was found 15% at fault. The Plaintiff was 48 years old. He waited 4 months to get medical treatment.

The pain and suffering award was broken down to: $30,000 for past pain and suffering, and $15,000 for future pain and suffering. The case was tried in Broward County. The case is Lloyd Scott vs. Broward Partnership for the Homeless.

My thoughts: This is a good result for the Plaintiff because the Plaintiff waited 4 months to get medical treatment following the incident. I know of a personal injury in Miami who will not take a case if a person waits more than 7 days to get medical treatment. As you can imagine, the settlement value of your case generally decreases the longer you wait to get medical treatment.

The claims adjuster will argue that the accident or incident did not cause your ankle tear because if it did, you would have been in bad pain and gone to the doctor immediately or shortly after the accident.

Since the plaintiff was 48 years old at the time of the accident, he had a life expectancy of 31 more years. You can find someone’s life expectancy by going to this chart. So he was awarded about $500 per year ($1.37 per day) per future pain and suffering. The plaintiff was awarded $10,000 per year for past pain and suffering. I arrived at this amount because it took 3 years for this case to get trial.

Actual Verdict (Not mine): $20,000 in pain and suffering for a tear of the peroneus longus muscle in a man’s right ankle. He claimed that he tripped and fell on an open water meter box. The lawsuit was against the City of Ormond Beach, located in Volusia County, Florida. He did not sue for medical bills or lost wages. The jury found the city liable for the incident but found the man 10% fault.  The verdict was reduced by 10% which means he could recover $18,000 for pain and suffering.

My thoughts: I said the man could recover $18,000 by using the following formula:

Recoverable Award = Total Verdict x (1-  .x comparative fault)

I use the word “recoverable” because, unlike some individuals who may not have insurance, the city has the money to pay this claim. In Florida, the current law states that a city does not have to pay more than $200,000 to an individual it injured in an accident.

Since the jury found the man 10% at fault, we substance “x”  with “.10″ which is:

Recoverable Award = $20,000 x (1-  .1 comparative fault)

Recoverable Award = $20,000 x (.9)

Recoverable Award = $18,000

Things to Consider in a Broken Ankle or Ankle Tear Case

You should look at several things to determine the amount of money that you may get for your wrist fracture from an accident or incident. Some of these are:

1. Insurance Coverage.

There needs to be insurance coverage without an exclusion or the fault party needs to have money to pay for your case. If the auto insurer or business liability insurer has a policy with liability insurance on the policy, you may not get any money if the insurer denies coverage (even if you have a fractured ankle). If you slipped or tripped and fell at a business establishment, there probably will not be an exclusion that will allow the insurance company to deny coverage. An exclusion in a liability policy may allow the insurer to assert a coverage defense and deny your claim if your injuries are caused by an intentional act of a company or person. Examples of common exclusions that may apply are if the at-fault party:

  • Intentionally injured you (e.g. beat you up, roughed you up, or purposely hit you)
  • Was driving a motor vehicle without permission (e.g. stolen car, etc.)
  • Was driving a motor vehicle that is not listed on a company’s business liability policy
  • Is driving a car that he or she owns but is not listed on his or her auto insurance policy

In a motor vehicle accident (e.g. car accident, truck accident, etc.), even if the at-fault party has an exclusion, you may still be able to make a claim under uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance if it is available.

2. Bodily Injury Liability Insurance, Business liability Insurance or Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist (UM/UIM) Insurance.

These insurance coverages are optional in Florida. A driver or owner of a car does not have to have bodily injury liability coverage. A car owner does not have to carry uninsured/underinsured (UM/UIM) motorist coverage. A business does not have to have business liability insurance. The good news is that if you slipped or tripped and fell at a business establishment, most of the time it has a business liability insurance policy that usually has liability limits that are enough to pay for your injuries. Often times, the business carries liability limits of one million dollars or more.

If you are injured at a large store with multiple locations, there is a strong likelihood that the store is self-insured (at least for a large amount). Examples of some companies that are self-insured are Sedano’s Supermarket, Publix SupermarketsWinn Dixie SupermarketWalmartTargetCostco, and many other stores. If you fractured your ankle while on a cruise ship, the cruise lines (Carnival Cruise Lines, Royal Caribbean, Holland America, Celebrity Cruise Lines, Costa Cruises, etc.) are self- insured and they have enough money to pay for your injuries.

Example #1 – Injured at large store – Insurance not an issue

You are walking in a Publix Supermarket in Kendall or any city in Florida and you slip and fall on a substance as you are turning a corner. You are not exactly sure what you fell on, but perhaps it consisted of: footprints, tracks, grimy, greasy, dirty, rotting, smudges, streaks of the substance, or a large puddle.

That evidence may allow you to prove constructive notice and argue that Publix should have cleaned it up. For purposes of this example, I will assume that Publix is liable for the accident, and you are not at fault. In reality, proving constructive notice in a slip and fall case is generally more difficult than proving that the store was aware of a substance on the floor.

Your ankle (malleolus) is fractured. You are 60 years old and retired so you have no lost wages. Your out-of-pocket medical bills are $3,000. You get a little bit of physical therapy. The cast is removed after 6 weeks or so. You have little or no limitations, and little or no permanent injury.

Since you did not have surgery, you recovered quickly, the value of pain and suffering may be somewhere around $25,000 or so. This is the low end of the range for a simple ankle fracture.

Case value = (Pain and suffering) + (Medical Bills) + (Lost Wages)

Case value = ($25,000) + ($3,000) + ($0)

Case value = approximately $28,000

Now because Publix is self-insured, you may be able to settle this claim with Publix for $28,000 or so. You do not have to worry about Publix not having enough insurance to pay for your pain and suffering and medical bills.

The reality is that in many cases involving an ankle fracture, there is liability insurance but there is not enough to cover you for the value of your case.

Example #2 – Limited insurance effect on recovery

You are driving a motorcycle in South Miami, (or any city in Florida) and you are hit by a driver of a car who rear ends you. Let’s assume that you were stopped and did nothing to contribute to the accident. The owner of the car that hit you only has $10,000 in bodily injury (B.I.) liability coverage with State Farm Insurance Company. Following the accident, you set up a claim with State Farm.

Because a Florida car owner may be liable for damages that a driver of his or her car causes, you can make a claim against the BI insurance of the owner. In addition, the driver has $10,000 in BI insurance. You did not purchase uninsured (UM) on your car, and you do not live with any relatives that have UM/UIM auto insurance.

Your ankle (malleolus) is fractured. You are 60 years old and retired. Your out of pocket medical bills are $15,000. You go the emergency room, and you treat with doctors and get physical therapy for over a year. You have some limitations. You can walk without a cane, and do not have a limp. Since you still have “issues”, the value of pain and suffering may be somewhere around $50,000. The amount of money that you may get for settlement purposes is further from the low end of the range of pain and suffering for a fractured ankle. Because you are not at fault, the settlement formula for this case is:

Case value = (Pain and suffering) + (Medical Bills) + (Lost Wages)

Case value = ($50,000) + ($15,000) + ($0)

Case value = approximately $65,000 or so

Even though your case may be worth $65,000 or so, you may only get the $10,000 BI limits from the car and the $10,000 from the driver of the car that hit you because that it is the only liability insurance that is available. You may only get $20,000 due to limited insurance. I settled a slip and fall case with similar injuries for $25,000, but that was because my client had comparative fault and she had very low medical bills.

3. Comparative Negligence (Fault)

In both of the above examples, I assumed that you were not at fault. If you were comparatively negligent (at-fault), the value of your case will be reduced.

Example #3

Let’s say that you are driving a car in Kendall (or any city in Florida), and you make a left hand turn in front of another car that had the right of way. To keep it simple, assume that you are 90% at fault. The owner of the car that hit you only has $10,000 in bodily injury (B.I.) liability coverage and the driver has $10,000 in liability coverage. You can make a claim against the BI insurance of the car owner and the driver’s BI insurance.

Your out of pocket medical bills are $3,000. You get a little bit of physical therapy. The cast is removed after 6 weeks or so. You really don’t have any or many limitations or permanent injury. Since you do not have any or many limitations, the value of your pain and suffering may be $25,000. If you failed to yield the right of way and are 90% comparatively negligent, the value of your claim is reduced by 90%.

To keep it simple, in the formula to calculate the value of your case, I will use the abbreviation of P & S for pain and suffering.

Value = [(P & S) + (Medical Bills)] – {[(P & S)+ (Medical Bills)] X (% your fault)}

Value of Case = {[($25,000) + ($3,000)] – {[($25,000)+ ($3,000)]} X .9}

Value of Case = {[$28,000] – {[$28,200] x .9}

Value of Case = {[$28,000] – {[$28,000 X .9]}

Case Value = {[$28,000] – {[$25,200]}

Case Value = $2,800

4. Permanent Injury (Threshold Injury).

There are certain situations in motor vehicle accidents in Florida where you need to prove that you have a permanent injury (a/k/a “threshold” injury) in order to get any money for pain and suffering. This “threshold” law does not apply to non-motor vehicle cases such as slip and falls, trip and falls, and other types of accidents.

In Florida, whether you need to prove that you have a permanent injury to get money for pain and suffering, depends on whether you were involved in a car accidentmotorcycle accidentbike (bicycle) accident, or pedestrian accident.

If a doctor does not say that you have a permanent injury, there is a possibility that the liability insurer (who is ultimately pays your claim) may not offer any money for pain and suffering. Even though the medical records do not state that my client has a permanent injury, I have had many cases where the bodily injury liability insurer for the owner or driver of the at-fault motor vehicle offers money before a lawsuit is filed.

Even if you cannot prove that you have a permanent injury, you are still allowed to make a claim for economic damages (past medical bills, past lost wages, future medical bills and loss of future earning capacity).

5. Insurance Company

Some insurers have a reputation for paying more than others for the same exact case. This assumes that the damages due not significantly exceed the policy limits.

So Many Factors Affect the Case Value

As you can see from the above examples, there are many factors that affect that value of your ankle fracture case. Every case is different, and one factor can greatly change the value of your case.

Did you injure your ankle or another body part an accident in Florida or on a cruise ship? 

I have settled many Florida injury and cruise claims. I want to represent you if you were injured in an accident in Florida, on a cruise ship or boat. Call me now at (888) 594-3577 to Get a Free Consultation. There are No Fees or Costs Unless We Recover Money.

I will not become your attorney by you leaving a comment. There is a time limit to file a lawsuit. All comments are posted anonymously but will be public.   I only can represent you if your injury happened in Florida or on a cruise ship; or if the injured person lives in Florida or a family member (in the case of a death) lives in Florida. This is because I am only licensed in Florida.

Comments

  1. Person who fell on stairs at a apartment complex says:

    Just trying to get an idea of where I stand. I fell on a set of stairs in an Apartment complex in Northern FL. I live in SWFL. No apparent/visable cause for my fall. It happened so quick, I do not have a clue as to why I fell. Claim manager for Insurance Company is keeping close contact with me regarding my progress. I broke my ankle in 3 places, dislocated it, had to have ORIF surgery, staph infection six weeks post-op (requiring outpatient Vancomycin IV for a week), probably going to need hardware removal within next few months, still have a limp 5.5 months after. Just wondering what neighborhood I should be in if any “Settlement” amount is offered.

    • Justin Ziegler, Injury Lawyer says:

      Dear person who slipped and fell on a stairs,

      Thank you for your comment! Disclaimer: I am not your attorney. There is a time limit to file a lawsuit.

      It sounds to me like you sustained a trimalleolar fracture, which can be a devastating injury. In order to calculate whether any “settlement” amount is offered, I would need to know whether you gave a recorded statement to the claims adjuster.

      If you gave a recorded statement whereupon you stated that you “have no clue why you fell” and there was no “apparent/visible cause for [your] fall”, then I will not be surprised if they deny liability and offer nothing under the personal injury coverage part of their insurance policy.

      My answer is the same if you gave a non-recorded statement to the claims adjuster and said the same things as you said above. However, if you file a lawsuit and all they have is your unrecorded statement stating – what you said above – than they may pay nuisance value to make you go away assuming there is nothing wrong with the staircase.

      This is because in Florida, in a slip and fall case like yours in order to get money for damages you must prove that the apartment complex, management Company or whoever else was negligent and their negligence caused your injury.

      If the apartment complex, property management company, etc. has medical payments coverage under their policy, that will pay for your medical bills up to a certain amount regardless of fault.

      If I were you, assuming that it is legal, I would immediately take pictures of the staircase. Often times, the improper paint was used, there were no slip resistant strips, or the risers were in disproportionate heights, or the handrail was not to code. An engineer expert is usually needed to examine the steps.

      You should request in writing that any video is preserved and that the steps are not altered destroyed or modified in any way.

      You should NOT be speaking with the insurance company unless you have handled many of these cases.

      I had a $195,000 settlement (gross) – as co-counsel – years ago for a client who fell down the stairs at an apartment complex. It is possible that you would look at a picture of the stairs that he fell on and say that there was no “apparent/visible cause for the fall” and perhaps my client had no clue why he fell when he did.

      If there were something wrong with the stairs, it would help in my evaluation to know the amount of your out of pocket medical bills as well as whether there are any health insurance liens that may need to be repaid. There may also be other liens. It may also benefit you to have an attorney if you have health insurance, Medicare or Medicaid as they may allow for a reduction of their lien by attorney’s fees and costs.

      You should be sending your medical bills and records to the claims adjuster immediately, as well as any MRI, x-ray or CT scan of your ankle.

      Hopefully you did not give a statement to the claims adjuster stating that there was nothing wrong, etc.

      As I said in the above article, I have seen trimalleolar ankle fracture verdicts for over $1 million dollars.

      There is no correlation between a claims adjuster keeping “close contact with you” and paying to settle your case. I have had a very friendly claims adjuster give me a final offer of $20,000 before I filed a lawsuit. After I filed a lawsuit and litigated the case, we settled for $210,000.

      Feel free to call me at 888-594-3577 for a free consultation anytime if you want to hire an attorney. We handle cases in Southwest Florida and throughout the entire state of Florida. There are no attorney fees or costs unless we recover money.

  2. Lady whose husband had 2 ankle surgeries from work accident says:

    My husband fell at work and injured his ankle in October 19 2011. He has been collecting workmans comp. He has had 2 surgeries already and he is up for another surgery. The 2nd surgery they put in 4 screws and fused bones together. The next surgery will be in 6 months and that may be to fuse all his ankle bones and foot bones together. What can we expect if we were to do a settlement or a lawsuit?

    • Justin Ziegler, Injury Lawyer says:

      Dear Lady whose husband had 2 ankle surgeries from work accident,

      Thank you for your comment! Disclaimer: I am not your husband’s attorney. There is a time limit to file a lawsuit.

      I am sorry to hear that your husband was hurt badly. I can imagine that this has been a very stressful time for you. I am only licensed to practice law in Florida, so my response only applies to an accident that occurred in Florida.

      You mentioned that your husband was injured at work. I wrote an article that talks about the workers’ rights if you are injured on the job in Florida. I cannot tell you how much his case may be worth, in part, because he still has another major surgery scheduled.

      Also, if anyone’s – other than your husband’s employer – negligence (failure to use reasonable care) caused this accident, then your husband may have a personal injury claim against them. If you think that anyone else was negligent, please give me a detailed description of the accident, and I can give you some of my thoughts.

      You may also have a personal injury case against his employer under the unrelated works doctrine.

      I wish your husband a speedy recovery. I suggest that your husband hire an attorney immediately.

      If this accident happened in Florida and your husband wants to hire a lawyer, feel free to call me at 888-594-3577. We work on these cases throughout the entire state of Florida with another law firm. There are no attorney fees or costs unless we recover money.

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